Snake Pictures – AZ Animals

Blue viper snake on branch ready to attack prey
© Kurit afshen/Shutterstock.com
Poisonous snake, Malayan pit viper (Calloselasma rhodostoma)
© Worraket/Shutterstock.com
Snake, Great lakes bush viper
© reptiles4all/Shutterstock.com
King Brown Snake
© Ken Griffiths/Shutterstock.com
Snake, Pythons Hatching in Everglades
© Heiko Kiera/Shutterstock.com
King cobra, Ophiophagus hannah, venomous snake against white background
Snake Teeth - Snake Skull
© Mirko Graul/Shutterstock.com
Snakes in Hawaii - Brown Tree Snake
© Janelle Lugge/Shutterstock.com
A Western Fox Snake semi-coiled . the snake is light brownn with darker brown splotches. with isolate background.
© James DeBoer/Shutterstock.com
Milk Snake - Woman Holding Milk Snake
© Siarhei Kasilau/Shutterstock.com
What Do Milk Snakes Eat - Campbell's Milk Snake
© Seregraff/Shutterstock.com

Black and Red Snake, Eastern Mud Snake, Farancia abacura

Eastern Mud Snake
© Nathan A Shepard/Shutterstock.com

Florida Banded Water Snake – profile

Florida-banded water snake
© iStock.com/passion4nature

Found in many of the bodies of water in Florida, the Florida-banded water snake consumes everything from frogs to turtles.

Despite its eye-catching color spectrum, the Eastern Coral snake is highly venomous.

Eastern Coral Snake
© iStock.com/JasonOndreicka

A Florida Pine Snake coiled on the ground.

Florida Pine Snake
© iStock.com/JasonOndreicka

Though non-venomous, the Florida Pine snake squeezes its prey to death.

Eastern Indigo Snake stock photo
Navy Blue, Snake, East, Animal, Animal Scale The eastern indigo snake is a large nonvenomous snake native to the Eastern United States.

Eastern Indigo Snake
© iStock.com/sstaton

The Eastern indigo snake may be non-venomous, but its ability to grow over nine feet in length makes it daunting.

Indotyphlops braminus, commonly known as the brahminy blind snake , Satara, Maharashtra, India

Brahminy Blind Snake
© RealityImages/Shutterstock.com

Thin and tiny, the Brahminy blind snake is sometimes mistaken for a baby snake of another species.

Indotyphlops braminus, commonly known as the brahminy blind snake , Satara, Maharashtra, India

© RealityImages/Shutterstock.com

Monterey Ring-necked snake in a defensive posture. Big Sur, California, USA.

Ring-necked snake
© yhelfman/Shutterstock.com

Small and colorful, the ring-necked snake is nocturnal and non-venomous.

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Malformation Snake Two Heads

pet snake on humans hand
© iStock.com/Vagengeym_Elena

Snakes rely fully on external heat or light sources.

What Do Corn Snakes Eat
© A-Z-Animals.com
Texas rat snake blending in with rock
© Silent Shoot/Shutterstock.com

Snakes do not hibernate. Instead, they brumate.

grass snake on lily pad in water
© Dr.Pixel/Shutterstock.com

Snakes require an external heat source to power their metabolism.

group of garter snakes in den
© Jukka Palm/Shutterstock.com
indigo snake curled up in burnt grass
© Patrick K. Campbell/Shutterstock.com

Snakes that are kept as pets are more likely to eat themselves than snakes in the wild.

Large black snake held by a boy – Black Rat Snake, Pantherophis or Elaphe obsoleta (focus centered on snake)

Best Pet Snakes
© Matt Jeppson/Shutterstock.com
Best Pet Snakes
© TheTexasNaturalist/Shutterstock.com

Louisiana Milk-snake found after a fall cold front blew through southeast Texas. The common name “milk snake” originated from the false belief that these snakes milked cows.

By Ltshears – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7984337 Ltshears / Creative Commons
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African House Snake Lamprophis fuliginosus at the Louisville Zoo. They are named “house” snakes as they are frequently found around human dwellings, feeding on the rodents that congregate around the human waste.

Best Pet Snakes
© Enrique Ramos/Shutterstock.com

Corn snakes are constrictors, wrapping themselves around prey to squeeze and subdue it before swallowing it whole.

Best Pet Snakes
© Creeping Things/Shutterstock.com
Best Pet Snakes
© Krisda Ponchaipulltawee/Shutterstock.com

Ball pythons are named after their natural defensive behaviors. They tend to curl up into a ball with their head toward the center of the ball when threatened.

Best Pet Snakes
© K Quinn Ferris/Shutterstock.com

Common eastern Garter snake, coiled in the grass. Garter snakes don’t have fangs and aren’t venomous. However, they do have a few rows of small teeth and can bite.

Best Pet Snakes
© Steve Oehlenschlager/Shutterstock.com

Western Hognose Snake with its hood inflated. The hognose snakes’ most distinguishing characteristic is their upturned snout, which aids in digging in sandy soils by using a sweeping, side-to-side motion. 

Boa constrictors are a popular pet snake option.

Best Pet Snake option - boa constrictor
© Natalia Kuzmina/Shutterstock.com

Boa constrictors are non-venomous snakes famous for their method of subduing prey: squeezing, or constricting, it to death.

Best Pet Snakes
© My Lit’l Eye/Shutterstock.com

The Children’s Python gets its name from the scientist who first described them in 1842, John George Children, the curator of the British Museum’s zoological collection at the time of the discovery.

What Does a Copperhead Snake Look Like
© Jeff W. Jarrett/Shutterstock.com

Broad-Band Copperhead snake (Agkistrodon contortrix laticinctus) on black background

What Does a Copperhead Snake Look Like
© Joe McDonald/Shutterstock.com
puffing snake in wooded area
© Vaclav Sebek/Shutterstock.com

Snakes typically deposit the waste from a meal all at once.

How Often Do Snakes Shed
© Ultrakwang/Shutterstock.com

A regularly recurrent event during the activity period of all snakes is the shedding, or molting, of the skin.

How Often Do Snakes Shed
© iStock.com/Dr-MYM

An exotic veterinarian helping a smooth snake to shed its skin.

How Often Do Snakes Shed
© iStock.com/bitis73

Boiga snake dendrophila yellow ringed, Head of Boiga dendrophila, animal closeup, animal attack

Where Do Snakes Live
© Kurit afshen/Shutterstock.com

Black rat snake looking in sliding glass door on back porch in North Carolina in spring. Snake season is beginning. Practice pet safety

Where Do Snakes Live
© Kyla Metzker/Shutterstock.com

A Black rat snake looking in sliding glass door on back porch of a house in North Carolina in spring.

Where Do Snakes Live
© Patrick K. Campbell/Shutterstock.com

A Green anaconda (Eunectes murinus), which is especially partial to flooded grassland.

Where Do Snakes Live
© Realest Nature/Shutterstock.com
Where Do Snakes Live
© Rich Carey/Shutterstock.com

A Banded Sea Snake swimming over a coral reef.

Where Do Snakes Live
© Seth LaGrange/Shutterstock.com

Water moccasin floating on water. Water moccasins are very common in wetlands.

Where Do Snakes Live
© Vince Adam/Shutterstock.com

A juvenile Borneo Paradise Flying Snake on a leaf. These snakes commonly live in the rainforest.

Cottonmouth swimming in water. The snake has a long, thick, muscular body measuring up to 6 feet in size.
© Seth LaGrange/Shutterstock.com

Cottonmouth swimming in water. The snake has a long, thick, muscular body measuring up to 6 feet in size.

The Cottonmouth is characterized by a large, spade-shaped head, bright white mouths, and alternating bands of light and dark patterns.
© Katie Flenker/Shutterstock.com

The Cottonmouth is characterized by a large, spade-shaped head, bright white mouths, and alternating bands of light and dark patterns.

Cottonmouth vs. Water Snake - Pair of northern water snakes
© samray/Shutterstock.com
Cottonmouth vs Water Snake 1200x627
© A-Z-Animals.com
Cottonmouth vs Water Snake 360x450
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Cottonmouth vs Water Snake 1050x450
© A-Z-Animals.com

Green Tree Python/Emerald Boa eating a mouse

green snake eating a mouse
© iStock.com/mjf795
What Eats Snakes
© Rafael Goes/Shutterstock.com
What Eats Snakes
© Yarlander/Shutterstock.com

Grilled snake on a skewer with chili sauce and steamed rice on white plate on mat top view. Cooked snake is a popular choice in some cultures.

What Eats Snakes
© Barbara Ash/Shutterstock.com

Scientists in the UK have found that the Secretary Bird, native to sub-Saharan Africa, can deliver precise and powerful kicks with a force five times its own body weight; enough to kill venomous snakes in less than the blink of an eye.

What Eats Snakes
© Radiant Reptilia/Shutterstock.com

Kingsnakes are known for eating other snakes – including venomous species. Kingsnakes are apparently immune to the venom of the snake species upon which they prey.

What Eats Snakes
© iStock.com/ErikMandre

The wolverine is very quick and can run at speeds of up to 30 miles per hour when chasing its prey. The wolverine also pounces on its prey from trees.

What Do Snakes Eat
© A-Z-Animals.com
What Do Garter Snakes Eat
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Rat Snake vs Copperhead 1200x627
© A-Z-Animals.com
© A-Z-Animals.com
© A-Z-Animals.com

White Texas rat snake in a bird’s nest.

white snake with eggs
© iStock.com/alkir

Snake eggs that aren’t white or off-white are more than likely not viable.

snake poking through leaves
© iStock.com/Govert van Tongerloo

Snakes sometimes come out of their shelters to bask in the sunlight during brumation.

deadly toxic eyelash viper snake in Costa Rica

eyelash viper wrapped on branch
© Fabrice Mieville/Shutterstock.com

Snakes do not eat more to store fat before entering brumation.

Coral Snake vs Milk Snake
© A-Z-Animals.com

Amazon Tree Boa Snake Shedding it’s Skin

snake shedding skin
© iStock.com/Mark Kostich

Snakes shed their skin in one piece.

© A-Z-Animals.com
© A-Z-Animals.com
Snakes That Look Like Copperheads
© Joe McDonald/Shutterstock.com

Snakes That Look Like Copperheads

Eastern Rat Snake
© Mike Wilhelm/Shutterstock.com

Large adult Eastern black rat snake in defensive coiled posture on a road. When threatened, rat snakes will “rattle” their tail, fooling other animals into believing they are venomous.

Snakes That Look Like Copperheads-Eastern Milk Snake
© Jay Ondreicka/Shutterstock.com

Eastern milk snakes are very beneficial animals, especially for farmers, as they hunt down small rodents often found on farm buildings and barns.

Snakes That Look Like Copperheads-Mole Kingsnake
© iStock.com/William Krumpelman

Mole kingsnakes are rarely seen in the wild since they tend to be fossorial, spending much of their time underground and out of sight.

Snakes That Look Like Copperheads-Texas Brown Snake
© Matt Jeppson/Shutterstock.com

Texas Brown Snake, Storeria dekayi texana. There are seven subspecies recognized.

Snakes That Look Like Copperheads-Black Racer Snake
© Breck P. Kent/Shutterstock.com

The black racer is an agile and very fast animal that can “run” (crawl) 4 miles per hour when it is threatened, hence the name “racer”.

Snakes That Look Like Copperheads-Eastern Hognose Snake
© IHX/Shutterstock.com

Northern Water Snake basking on a rock. Northern water snakes are also confused with another Connecticut snake, the venomous northern copperhead. Copperheads, however, are rarely found in water.

Snakes That Look Like Copperheads-Northern Water Snake
© jmarino/Shutterstock.com
Snakes That Look Like Copperheads-Corn Snake
© Enrique Ramos/Shutterstock.com

A beautiful corn snake in the garden. The name corn snake may have originated from the markings on this snake’s belly, which resemble maize, or Indian corn.

Are snakes mammals
© Vaclav Sebek/Shutterstock.com

The Puffing Snake, Phrynonax poecilonotus, is a species of nonvenomous snake in the family Colubridae. The species is endemic to the New World.

Animals That Play Dead Eastern Hognose Snake
Animals That Play Dead Texas Indigo Snake
© Joe Farah/Shutterstock.com

The Texas indigo snake received its common name from the glossy iridescent ventral scales which can be seen as blackish-purple in bright light.

Corn Snake vs Copperhead
© A-Z-Animals.com
Corn Snake vs Copperhead
© A-Z-Animals.com
Corn Snake vs Copperhead
© A-Z-Animals.com
Animals That Lay Eggs
© Mark_Kostich/Shutterstock.com

A juvenile Green Tree Python Snake in a tree, coiled and ready to strike.

Deadliest Animal in the World: Snakes

Deadliest Animal in the World: Snakes
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Spectacled cobra, Naja naja, Bangalore, Karnataka. The Indian cobra is one of the big four venomous species that inflict the most snakebites on humans in India.

Fear of Animals: Ophidiophobia

Fear of Animals: Ophidiophobia
© Kurit afshen/Shutterstock.com

A yellow-ringed Boiga snake ready to attack. Snakes can’t bite food so have to swallow it whole.

flying snake closeup on black backround, Flying snake ”Chrysopelea”

Animals that fly – flying snake
© Kurit afshen/Shutterstock.com

There are five recognized species of flying snakes.

World’s Scariest Animal: Belcher’s Sea Snake

World's Scariest Animal: Belcher's Sea Snake
© SaltedLife/Shutterstock.com

Venom from the Belcher’s Sea Snake is so toxic, that a single bite can kill a human being in less than thirty minutes.

Smallest Snakes
Small non-poisonous grass snake on the woman’s palm.

Smallest Snakes
© Egoreichenkov Evgenii/Shutterstock.com

Smallest Snakes: Barbados Thread snake John Oldale / CC BY-SA 3.0
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The diminutive Barbados Thread snake might easily be mistaken for an earthworm, and can comfortably curl up on a U.S. quarter.

Smallest Snakes: Brahminy Blind Snake

Smallest Snakes: Brahminy Blind Snake
© Patrick K. Campbell/Shutterstock.com

Brahminy Blind Snake may get into the home along with potted plants, or come in from outside by crawling under doors or through cracks.

Smallest Snakes: Flat-headed Snake
Flat-headed Snake (Tantilla gracilis) harmless North American Snake

Smallest Snakes: Flat-headed Snake
© Creeping Things/Shutterstock.com

The Flat-headed Snake is a burrowing species. It spends most of its time in slightly moist soil under rocks or in underground burrows.

Smallest Snakes: Lined Snake

Smallest Snakes: Lined Snake
© Matt Jeppson/Shutterstock.com

Lined snakes are small and thin and have small heads that are hardly wider than their body.

Smallest Snakes: Ringneck Snake

Smallest Snakes: Ringneck Snake
© Michael K. McDermott/Shutterstock.com

Ringneck Snakes will play dead when threatened.

Biggest Snakes
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Biggest Snakes: The Green Anaconda

Biggest Snakes: The Green Anaconda
© Patrick K. Campbell/Shutterstock.com

The Green Anaconda give birth to live young, that are about two feet long when they are born.

Biggest Snakes: The Reticulated Python
reticulatus pyhton defense on the flor

Biggest Snakes: The Reticulated Python
© Opayaza12/Shutterstock.com

The Reticulated Python is one of the snakes very popular with expert reptile keepers.

Biggest Snakes: The Amethystine Python

Biggest Snakes: The Amethystine Python
© IanRedding/Shutterstock.com

Amethystine Pythons are very good swimmers and will travel by water when it is required.

Biggest Snakes: The Indian Python

Biggest Snakes: The Indian Python
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Main threats to Indian pythons include habitat loss, collection for the pet trade and hunting for their skin which is highly valued in the leather trade.

Biggest Snakes: The African Rock Python

Biggest Snakes: The African Rock PythonBiggest Snakes: The African Rock Python
© zaferkizilkaya/Shutterstock.com

Like all pythons, the African Rock Python is non-venomous. It kills by constriction, ambushing and coiling around its prey.

Biggest Snakes: The Black Mamba

Biggest Snakes: The Black Mamba
© Cormac Price/Shutterstock.com

Black Mambas are also among the fastest snakes in the world, slithering at speeds of up to 12.5 miles per hour.

Biggest Snakes: The Boa Constrictor

Biggest Snakes: The Boa Constrictor
© KatKade/Shutterstock.com

Boa constrictors have some sharp teeth which they use to latch onto their prey and hold tight while they wrap the rest of their body around their prey.

Biggest Snakes: The King Brown Snake

Biggest Snakes: The King Brown Snake
© Ken Griffiths/Shutterstock.com

The King Brown Snake usually shelter in burrows, deep soil cracks, logs, rock piles, and timber or rubbish piles when living near humans.

Cottomouth vs Copperhead
© Mark_Kostich/Shutterstock.com
Cottonmouth Snake
© Jay Ondreicka/Shutterstock.com

Cottonmouth snake displaying its white mouth as a warning.

© Kristian Bell/Shutterstock.com
Cottonmouth vs Water Snake - Cottonmouth
© KF2017/Shutterstock.com
© Aks Portfolio/Shutterstock.com
Most Venomous Snakes in the World - Dubois’s Reef Sea Snake
Most Venomous Snakes in the World - Hook-nosed Sea Snake ALL RIGHTS RESERVED https://www.inaturalist.org/guide_taxa/1332364
Most Venomous Snakes in the World - Yellow-bellied Sea Snake
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Blue viper snake on branch ready to attack prey
smallest animals - Slender Blind Snake
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© Paul V.F. Barradas / Creative Commons
(Original)

Tim Vickers – Public Domain

© Tim Vickers – Public Domain
© Lost Mountain Studio/Shutterstock.com

By Jayendra Chiplunkar – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=17650765 Common Krait
Jayendra Chiplunkar / CC BY-SA 3.0
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Most Venomous Snakes in the World - Tiger Rattlesnake
© DnDavis/Shutterstock.com
Most Venomous Snakes in the World - Eastern Brownsnake
© Ken Griffiths/Shutterstock.com
Most Venomous Snakes in the World - Inland Taipan
© Ken Griffiths/Shutterstock.com
Most Venomous Snakes in the World - Inland Taipan
Cobra
© Vova Shevchuk/Shutterstock.com

True cobras have larger hoods and smaller heads than king cobras

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