Brave Snake Charmer Shows Sassy King Cobra Who’s Boss

Key Points:
  • King cobras are quick to bite when confronted by an attacker and can rush forward with ease in the threat position.
  • Less than 25% of snake-related deaths in North America occur annually from bites from king cobras.
  • When cobras strike, venom is released from glands linked to the fangs during a bite. The poison is forced into the victim through the hollow fangs by contracting a little muscle.

A snake show is an event people of all ages can attend to see a variety of different serpents on display. When going to a snake show, you get a close encounter with some of the world’s most stunning snakes. These events are incredibly popular in Thailand and tourists line up to grab a seat. 

Located in Pattaya, Thailand, there’s a man that owns over 1,000 cobras. He has these slithering snakes as pets and chooses new ones every time he hosts a snake show! Footage of him in the snake den is enough to make your skin crawl! 

King cobras can be found throughout the Malay Peninsula, in northern India, eastern Indonesia, the Philippines, and southern China, including Hong Kong and Hainan.

Several of the cobras in the video are in an upright position, looking as if they’re ready to attack at any moment. King Cobra‘s hooded threat presentation may lead one to believe they are much more ferocious than they actually are. Kings are quick to bite when confronted by an attacker and can rush forward with ease in the threat position.

As this man is picking and choosing which snakes he wants for the upcoming show, a large King Cobra rises behind him. He quickly turns around almost to look at the snake and say, “Excuse you?” Instead, he gives the serpent a powerful smack on the head and it quickly bows out. 

See also  Snake Tattoo Wraps Around Collar Bone for Unique Look
Head on view of king cobra against a green background
Since king cobras are ophiophagous, other snakes make up the majority of their diet.

©mrjo/Shutterstock.com

King Cobra Facts

There are other men behind the camera that laugh at the interaction. The King will run away rather than confront a tormentor. Less than 25% of snake-related deaths in North America occur annually from bites from king cobras.

Since king cobras are ophiophagous, other snakes make up the majority of their diet. They even consume other poisonous snakes! They are known to feed on small mammals, reptiles, birds, and other animals when food is in short supply. King cobras can live up to 20 years in the wild.

The lethal fangs of the king cobra are almost 0.5 inches long. They must be brief since they are attached to the upper jaw. They would pierce its mouth’s floor if they were any longer. The fangs of the snake are angled back towards its mouth, pushing the prey closer to its stomach. The king cobra is typically 10 to 12 feet long, but it can grow to be 18 feet long.

When cobras strike, venom is released from glands linked to the fangs during a bite. The poison is forced into the victim through the hollow fangs by contracting a little muscle. Neurotoxins quickly paralyze the neurological system of the prey, particularly the respiratory impulses. The paralyzed victim begins to be digested by other toxins. Take a look at the snake charmer showing the serpent who’s in charge in the video below! 

Should You Hit a Cobra on the Head if Threatened?

If you happened upon a Cobra, the last thing you should do is engage this dangerous, potentially deadly animal. Experts agree that the best thing to do is to remain calm and back away. If you can’t back up for some reason, walk around the snake – giving it a wide berth.

See also  The 6 Best Books About Seals (Including a Dopamine-Boosting Option!)

Up Next 

Discover the “Monster” Snake 5X Bigger than an Anaconda

Every day A-Z Animals sends out some of the most incredible facts in the world from our free newsletter. Want to discover the 10 most beautiful snakes in the world, a “snake island” where you’re never more than 3 feet from danger, or a “monster” snake 5X larger than an anaconda? Then sign up right now and you’ll start receiving our daily newsletter absolutely free.

Thank you for reading! Have some feedback for us? Contact the AZ Animals editorial team.